Chateau d’Esclans Domaines Sacha Lichine La Motte en Provence, France

Decanting the meteoric rise of Whispering Angel

Sacha Lichine teaches us all to embrace La Vie En Rosé...

It has been observed that there is something Falstaffian about Sacha Lichine, the man who can be reasonably credited with reinventing the largely snubbed rosé wine and sparking a peachy-toned revolution.

He is the embodiment of l’art de recevoir (that generous French spirit of hospitality which he considers to be a vital force in good business practice) and was born into wine royalty as the son of Alexis Lichine, the Russian wine mogul and entrepreneur.

Decanting the meteoric rise of Whispering Angel
Chateau d’Esclans Domaines Sacha Lichine La Motte en Provence, France

And though his creation, Whispering Angel, has earned itself the nickname ‘Hampton’s Water’ due to the insatiable thirst of wealthy partygoers and soaring sales in America, Lichine remains as unabashed and unpretentious as the pink wine we all love to love.

Changing perceptions...

As recently as a decade ago, rosé was synonymous with syrupy sweet, fuschia-toned hen party fuel — a wine for people who didn’t appreciate wine and, in particular, a wine for women. Today, you’ll be hard pressed to find a bar terrace in which no table plays host to a cluster of delicate wine glasses sweating in the sunshine and filled with pink.

You’ll be even less likely to spot a glass that hasn’t been snapped on an iPhone and shared online as a representation of instantly recognisable pleasure. Look harder, and you’ll notice that the wine is not a sickening shade of bright pink, and it might well not be being enjoyed by a woman.

Decanting the meteoric rise of Whispering Angel

This seismic shift in the Western consumption of rosé might have seemed unprecedented, even impossible, to most people in the early 2000s — but then, Sacha Lichine is not like most people

The man behind the alchemy...

It is difficult to extract rosé’s meteoric rise from Lichine’s empire, the heart of which operates from his idyllic vineyards in Provence — and nigh-on-impossible to separate it from the man behind the alchemy.

"This is a connoisseur whose first memory of being drunk came at aged five, on the occasion of his father’s wedding to the Hollywood actress Arlene Dahl..."

This is a connoisseur whose first memory of being drunk came at aged five, on the occasion of his father’s wedding to the Hollywood actress Arlene Dahl, so it is perhaps no surprise that he was destined for an extraordinary life. But this is not a story of a golden handshake or a path carved out by the hefty legacy of a familial dynasty.

Sacha’s business philosophy is “no risk, no reward”, and in the aftermath of his father’s death, he made the decision to relocate from Bordeaux to Provence, a move considered suicidal by many of those in his circle.

Drawing its name from the cherubic angels whose heads touch above an altar at the chapel on his property, Whispering Angel was the first of Sacha’s Provence rosés. 

Decanting the meteoric rise of Whispering Angel

Forging his own path...

In a marked departure from the strategy of his father, Sacha opted to make his a négociant wine, produced by purchasing grapes from multiple vineyards and thus allowing for the fruit to be picked when it is most ripe. 

This was the first in a long line of Sacha’s bold business decisions, all of which would ultimately prove instrumental in the brand’s success, and would also overhaul any outdated codes of viticulture.

Frustrated with the snobbishness he had known within the Bordeaux wine industry, Lichine opted for a notably anglicised name for his first rosé — with the contemporary (and pronounceable) English label serving as an equaliser across consumer cultures.

"The first vintage of 2006 Whispering Angel saw a production of 130,000 bottles — by 2017, that figure was in excess of 6 million..."

Another smart move, when one considers the astronomical success of Chateau d’Esclans wines in America, where well over half of the total production of Whispering Angel alone is exported.

Decanting the meteoric rise of Whispering Angel
Chateau d’Esclans Domaines Sacha Lichine La Motte en Provence, France

In another counter-cultural move, Lichine stuck to an inclusive price bracket when creating his pink wines and as a result, one can enjoy an entry level premium rosé (Whispering Angel), up to super premium rosés Château d’Esclans Rock Angel, Les Clans and Gorrus.

A risky strategy perhaps, but one which would serve him incredibly well, as the statistics attest. The first vintage of 2006 Whispering Angel saw a production of 130,000 bottles — by 2017, that figure was in excess of 6 million.

A lifelong passion...

Lichine credits his enormous success in part to his insightful knowledge of the wine production process from grape to bottle. Starting out at a young age, he has worked in some capacity at every level of the business — from the vineyards, to the cellars, to labelling wine bottles and working as a sommelier in America.

He also grew up between Manhattan and Bordeaux, with a foot firmly placed in each culture.

This fostered an understanding of how the production that takes place in Margaux comes to be appreciated and drunk in the bars of New York. The result has been a perfectly-cultivated universal appeal, with Château d’Esclans rosés earning a global reach in over 100 countries. Another undeniable factor in his juggernaut success is the working partnership between Sacha and Patrick Léon, former head winemaker at Château Mouton Rothschild.

Their combined expertise has resulted in a selection of wines which not only look beautiful, but consistently win awards and rave reviews from even the toughest industry critics.

Rosé for the Instagram age...

And then, of course, there is the colour. Lichine recognised that the shade of his rosé was of critical importance since, beside sauternes, it is the only wine which is bottled in clear glass. Throughout the production process, methods are used which ensure that minimal skin contact and cold temperature are maintained — all to create the desired paleness of colour.

"With Instagram has come the chance to observe the drinking world through rosé-tinted glasses..."

Herein lies the not-so-secret ingredient for building the ultimate rosé brand: ensure that your wine is of such a beautiful ballet-slipper hue that people will be pulling out their phones and uploading photos of their drink, to announce and celebrate their indulgence before an online audience.

Decanting the meteoric rise of Whispering Angel
Chateau d’Esclans Domaines Sacha Lichine La Motte en Provence, France

Lichine has also made the refreshing decision to embrace experimental, new-age marketing in order to accomplish his communication objectives. He has partnered with events like Coachella and, in doing so, filled millions of screens with photos of his wine, often in the fists of young, attractive festival-goers.

With the Age of Instagram, too, has come the chance to observe the drinking world through rosé-tinted glasses.

"Slogans like #brosé and #roséallday have served to make rosé synonymous today with shared pleasure and unapologetic enjoyment..."

This has provided the kind of hashtags you find yourself saying out loud (and instantly regretting). Slogans like #brosé and #roséallday have served to make rosé synonymous today with shared pleasure and unapologetic enjoyment.

For Lichine, the huge surge in the popularity of rosé comes as no surprise, and he doesn’t worry about the future. With the unique distinction of starting white and finishing red, rosé can be a perfect light aperitif, or equally well suited as a pairing to an impressive range of foods.

Decanting the meteoric rise of Whispering Angel
Chateau d’Esclans Domaines Sacha Lichine La Motte en Provence, France

Toasting to success...

All of this helps to fuel the idea that it really can be enjoyed at any time of day, and at any time of year. Considering this, and hearing Sacha talk about his creation, it becomes hard to believe that rosé was ever thought of as a less desirable drink than its white and red counterparts.

Finally, too, rosé seems to be breaking free of those irritating and unhelpful gender stereotypes. It seems to me that the rosé renaissance can be attributed to the distinctive way of life that a delicate pink wine bottle seems to promise — and its a way if life that cares little about gender. Lichine recognises this, describing his rosé as having a “festive” character and appeal.

Decanting the meteoric rise of Whispering Angel

He’s right, of course. Everyone can pinpoint a tangible memory where a glass of rosé toasted an anniversary, a wedding, or the final evening of a summer holiday. A sip of rosé is a very singular portal to another time, like the scent of a former lover’s perfume or a song that defines a teenage summer.

It is unabashed, celebratory and seemingly able to colour-match any chosen sunset. Perhaps just as importantly, it’s now an unspoiled symbol of fun and frivolity in an industry that can all too often come across as stuffy and severe.

Read the full story in the Sept/Oct issue of Gentleman’s Journal. Subscribe here…

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