How to pick a better rosé according to a top sommelier

We ask the head sommelier at Caprice Holdings & Birley Clubs the to let us in on what makes a great rosé, and when to invest...

Rejoice! Pink wine is having something of a renaissance. Formerly a snubbed alternative to its red and white counterparts, reserved for hen parties or sticky festivals — rosé is now finally being recognised for its versatility, quality and pairing possibilities. However, if you’re just beginning to dip your toes into this wonderful, salmon-pink pool then there’s a chance that you’re letting old habits die hard when it comes to ordering, purchasing or pairing.

Ever on hand to help, GJ asked renowned head sommelier and wine buyer for Caprice Holdings & Birley Clubs, Guillem Kerambrun to offer his top tips on how best to order, invest and enjoy rosé like a pro.

How to pick a better rosé according to a top sommelier
Guillem Kerambrun

Colour is key

According to Guillem, the colour is of paramount importance: “You don’t want one that is too dark but should also avoid anything too pale and closer to a white wine. The colour needs to be just right.”

How to pick a better rosé according to a top sommelier

Go Organic

If there is an organic rosé on offer, then Guillem suggests that you opt for it. In a similar way that organic food nourishes you in a way that no conventionally grown food can, the same can be said of organic wine. Plus, with far less sulphur dioxide, you can expect a far less painful head the next day.

Source from the seaside

“I have a weakness”, confesses Guillem, “for rosés made close to the sea — because they are often more delicate and elegant”. Grapes that are sourced from vines which look out across the vivid blue of the Mediterranean are hard to beat. Expect hints of sandalwood, spice — and an instant desire to book a holiday.

How to pick a better rosé according to a top sommelier

Delay your gratification

Test your patience and reap the rewards by putting something special away for a rainy day.  Find a rosé that you like and do not hesitate to save some bottles for the following year. A favourite rosé with a tiny bit of age will be taste all the better, according to Guillem.

How to pick a better rosé according to a top sommelier

Be bold with your pairing

Rosé is great as an aperitif or with some appetisers during summer, but can also be put to greater use with bold flavours and red meats. “A memory that sticks in my mind is a wine dinner at Scott’s last year, where the chef made a beautiful Red mullet with some braised Mediterranean vegetables and tapenade that I paired with the cuvée Symphonie Fantastique rosé from Château Sainte-Marguerite. It was simply amazing.”

How to pick a better rosé according to a top sommelier

Buy to share

“For me, a bottle of wine is meant to be shared and I like to use big format to serve. A magnum is a good size for aged wine but rosé in a jeroboam (3 litres) looks beautiful and is a great option for group dining in the summer!” So, what are you waiting for? Time to invest.

If this has whetted your appetite for a chilled glass of pink wine, here are three of the best rosés on the market according to Berry Bros. & Rudd…

How to pick a better rosé according to a top sommelier

2017 Le Grand Cros, Rosé, Domaine du Grand Cros

£13.95

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How to pick a better rosé according to a top sommelier

2017 Berry Bros. & Rudd Provence Rosé by Château la Mascaronne

£13.95

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How to pick a better rosé according to a top sommelier

2017 Berry Bros. & Rudd Reserve Rosé by Collovray & Terrier

£8.75

Buy Now

Further Reading