What to watch on Netflix in July 2022

From the biggest-budget film ever made by the streaming service to the long-awaited season finale of Stranger Things, here’s what to watch this month…

It’s a bumper month for Netflix. Expect high stakes, jet-setting and lashings of adrenaline. The budgets are bigger (The Gray Man is the streaming service’s most expensive film to date), the runtimes are longer (the Stranger Things season 4 finale is longer than most movies) and the stories are more gripping and far-fetched (despite many being true, see: D.B. Cooper: Where Are You? And Wingmen) than ever before.

So strap in, streamline your watchlist and get ready for a no-holds-barred barrage of quality, edge-of-your-seat entertainment. See you on the other side (of July)…

Stranger Things, Season 4: Volume 2, July 1st

Crank up the Kate Bush and carve out an afternoon — because the final two episodes of Stranger Things’ celebrated fourth season are coming, and they’re bigger than a demogorgon’s appetite. The first is 1 hour 25 minutes, and the finale is a whopping 2 hours 30 minutes. So kick back, order a pizza (Surfer Boy, naturally) and follow the Hawkin’s gang back into The Upside Down to tackle that veiniest of villains; Vecna. 

Up in the Air, July 1st

If you can cruise through airport security without George Clooney’s iconic instructional monologue playing on your mind, you’re a better man than me. “Never get behind people travelling with infants. I’ve never seen a stroller collapse in less than 20 minutes. Old people are worse. Their bodies are littered with hidden metal and they never seem to appreciate how little time they have left”. The whole film’s an understated, underrated gem — but it’s worth watching for Clooney’s cynicism (and Anna Kendrick’s wide-eyed naivety) alone. 

London Boulevard, July 1st

It’s with a morbid curiosity you should stick this one on. Because London Boulevard, for all its promise (Colin Farrell! Chic, sleek style! Mobster machinations!) fell badly flat when it was released in 2010. Which is odd, because its director was the man who wrote Scorsese’s The Departed, and its stellar cast includes Stephen Graham, Keira Knightley and David Thewlis. Give it a second chance; hopefully it’s aged into a cult classic.  

Wingmen, July 2nd

There are daredevils — and then there are wingmen. Named for the webbing-sleeved jumpsuits these free-jumpers and skydivers wear, this 2015 documentary follows three world-renowned extreme sportsmen  — Jokke Sommer, Espen Fadnes and Ludovic Woerth — as they travel the globe, seeking out the most dangerous and exhilarating proximity flight routes in the world. But it’s not without its risks, and be warned: things end in tragedy. 

The Longest Night, July 8th

If you’re a subtitle enthusiast, this Spanish-language six-part thriller series is perhaps the most promising new release of the month for you. Set in a psychiatric prison, a group of armed men attempt to infiltrate the facility to abduct an incarcerated serial killer. But, rather than relenting, the hard-nosed governor refuses to hand him over. With communications cut and a lockdown in effect, a bloody battle rages on through the night. 

How to Change Your Mind, July 12th

Based on the 2018 best-seller by Michael Pollan, this new Netflix original series asks some big questions about psychedelics, consciousness and the possible benefits of mind-altering substances. Each episode will focus on a different drug, whether that’s LSD, mescaline or MDMA — with Pollan himself speaking to experts about “addiction, depression and transcendence”. Deep stuff, but definitely worth a watch. 

D.B. Cooper: Where Are You?, July 13th

When our latest cover star, Tom Hiddleston, dramatised the infamous D.B. Cooper incident in last year’s Loki television series (in 1971, a suave, besuited skyjacker parachuted out of a plane with $200,000 in stolen cash — and promptly disappeared), it reignited interest in the urban legend. This latest foray into the exaggerations and fabrications around the tale (sky)dives deeper than ever before, tracing TV newsman Tom Colbert’s quest for the truth. 

Roadrunner: A Film About Anthony Bourdain, July 15th

Since his untimely suicide in 2018, chef Anthony Bourdain’s life has taken on a tragic quality — with many remembering him sadly or melancholically. Thankfully, this film by Morgan Neville, first released last year, shows Bourdain’s life as the incredible, emotional journey it really was; tinged with troubles but flourishing with talent, global travel and fierce love. Well worth your time if you’re a fan of Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown. 

The Father, July 17th

When an 83-year-old Anthony Hopkins won the Oscar for Best Actor in 2021, he became the oldest ever recipient of the award. But his portrayal of dementia-saddled octogenarian ‘Anthony’ in Florian Zeller’s acclaimed psychological drama is a blistering performance — and one only a man with decades of acting experience could have pulled off. Look out for Olivia Colman’s supporting turn — and await the sequel, The Son, which will see Hopkins revisit his role, and Hugh Jackman play the titular character. 

The Gray Man, July 22nd

Fresh from her scene-stealing turn in the latest Bond film, Ana de Armas is back in the spy game — and teaming up with charm machine Ryan Gosling. In The Gray Man, directed by the Avengers-helming Russo Brothers, Gosling plays the CIA’s most skilled mercenary. Upon discovering dark agency secrets, he becomes an international target, hunted by assassins everywhere from California to the Czech Republic — and all led by a Machiavellian, moustachioed Chris Evans. A shame it’s not at the cinema, but we’ve got high hopes with this one.

Want more Netflix recommendations? Here’s the best new titles to land on the streaming service in June 2022…

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