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Is 2017 the year that you should quit your job?


Even though the last twelve months were rich with water cooler moments, could your workplace be dragging you down?

Is 2017 the year that you should quit your job?
The Gentleman

We made it. 2017. After a year of troubles, trials and tribulations untold, we can finally put 2016 behind us and move forwards into the New Year.

But, even though the last twelve months were rich with water cooler moments, could your workplace be dragging you down? There are undoubtedly more turbulent times ahead, so take stock and consider if your current job is getting you to the places you want to go.

Do you spend your afternoons clock-watching? Are you being paid much less than you know your time is worth? Can you not see any upcoming chances to further your career? Then it may be time to jump ship.

Freelancing is easier and more lucrative

Depending on what job you do, freelancing can be a much better way to earn more money and have more freedom. From marketing to digital solutions to creative industries, a recent survey of 23,000 freelancers across the world found that those who don’t answer to a boss make an average salary of £31,000 for 36 hours work – slightly more than employees.

But remember, before you give your boss a piece of your mind, that freelancers don’t get sick pay or holiday allowance. They are however, happier…

Freelancers are considerably happier

The Association of Independent Professionals and the Self-Employed – so be aware that these statistics could very well be biased – found in a recent study that over 86 per cent of all freelancers are ‘very satisfied’ with the way they work.

Technology means that you could possibly do your job remotely

With an increase in connectivity in recent years, your job is likely achievable without the need to sit behind a desk for eight hours a day. So, even if your current company hasn’t grasped that as a possibility – another may well have done, and your dream job could be waiting for you at a more progressive firm.

Self-employment is also an increasingly popular option

Forget freelancing, why not work completely for yourself? The Office of National Statistics claims that there are now over 4.7 million self-employed people in Britain, which equates to 15 per cent of the working population.

So if you think you could do a better job than your current company, start your own business and spend time and care fleshing out your own firm into a rival.

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