The definitive guide to Savile Row

No1 Savile Row London

Savile Row: a street so laced with history and legend that it’s almost impossible to whittle down which shops are the most important. First built in 1750, it’s become a global destination for gentlemen and the place to head to if you’re in the market for a suit, jacket, shirt – or anything bespoke.

Savile Row is known all around the world for being home to some of the most trusted tailors, but we’re the first to admit that upon arrival, it can be a bit of a minefield. To make your life easier, we’ve created the definitive guide to Savile Row – where to start, and the best places to visit when you get there.

Gieves and Hawkes

inside Gieves & Hawkes No 1 Savile Row

Rightfully earning its place at N0. 1 Savile Row, Gieves & Hawkes should be the first stop for any gentleman visiting this world-famous shopping destination. Although the tailor has been dressing the royal family since 1809, No.1 Savile Row became home to Hawkes, then the most prestigious military tailor in London, in 1913. It was soon after this that Savile Row established itself as the most important tailoring street in the city. The brand today has over 450 years of combined experience and with a team of experts at your disposal, you’re guaranteed to have everything you could possibly need right at your fingertips and that, gentlemen, is certainly no bad thing.

Best for: bespoke tailoring fit for a royal

Visit Gieves & Hawkes at No.1 Savile Row, London, W1

For more information about the brand, see here. 

Hardy Amies

Hardie Amies Savile Row making of a bespoke suit

No trip to Savile Row is complete without a visit to Hardy Amies, a brand known all over the world for creating some of the most beautiful suits a gentleman can buy. Sir Hardy Amies received his prestigious title after becoming official dressmaker to Queen Elizabeth II – a feat that not many can claim. The fashion house with the same name was established in 1945 and soon moved into 8 Savile Row, the home that they are still in today.

Best for: the best overcoats a man can buy

Visit Hardy Amies at No.8 Savile Row, London, W1

For more information about the brand, see here.

Henry Poole

Inside Henry Poole Norman Dewis OBE, David Gandy and Simon Cundey gather to look at fabrics

Another fine tailor that no gentleman can miss on his trip to Savile Row is the globally-recognised Henry Poole. The brand was established eons ago in 1809 but still manages to stand out from the crowd by creating some of the most beautiful and timeless garments in the world. From suiting to outwear to some of the finest accessories money can buy, Henry Poole continues to be one of the most sought-after establishments on Savile Row – and long may that continue.

Best for: incredible black tie accessories

Visit Henry Poole at No.15 Savile Row, London, W1

For more information about the brand, see here.

Richard James

5 models wearing Richard James Savile Row London SS17
Richard James SS17

It can be difficult to find someone to rival all of the others mentioned in this definitive guide, but Richard James might do just that. Although the brand is a lot younger than some of its neighbours, it’s equally as important and established. Heritage still runs through the lining of the clothes, and every season Richard James pushes the boundaries of design and fashion and creates some of the most beautiful tailoring in the world.

Best for: classic tailoring with a modern edge

Visit Richard James at 29 Savile Row, London, W1

For more information about the brand, see here.

Richard Anderson

Richard Anderson Savile Row London

Last but certainly by no means least, no trip to Savile Row is complete without a stop at Richard Anderson. As another relatively new tailor on The Row, Richard Anderson very much keeps up with its surrounding competitors. The tailor very much specialises in bespoke, making each item entirely individual and unique to the wearer.

Best for: a bespoke suit

Visit Richard Anderson at 13 Savile Row, London, W1

For more information about the brand, see here.

Further Reading