Saturday, 22 July 2017
Close

5 style lessons we can learn from Eddie Redmayne


From suiting to scarves, what can Britain's acting ace teach us?

5 style lessons we can learn from Eddie Redmayne
Jonathan Wells

During an exclusive interview in the January/February issue of Gentleman’s Journal, Eddie Redmayne revealed that, despite coming out on top of ‘best dressed man’ polls the world over, he is in fact colourblind.

“I probably shouldn’t say this,” he said, “and it’s obviously a very flattering thing, but I don’t think I deserve those titles! You see, when you’re an actor and  you go to loads of red carpet things, all these different brands and all these amazing people just tell you what to wear. And, on top of that, I also have a wife – and she has no reservations telling me when I look ridiculous.”

But, whether or not Redmayne’s signature style comes as a result of teamwork or not, the young Brit has carved out a sartorial niche and influences fashions everywhere. Looking to be inspired? Look no further.

5 style lessons we can learn from Eddie Redmayne

The alternative suit

Colourblind he may be, but Redmayne’s eye for a brightly-coloured suit remains strong. From the double-breasted green he wore to the Toronto Film Festival to the luxe brown velvet number he sported to the Screen Actors Guild Awards, the actor isn’t afraid to push the envelope.

And this daring-do extends beyond colour. The cut of these suits, too, can be alternative – with lapels so peaked you could cut yourself on them and squared hems instead of the usual rounded. Take a leap, says Redmayne’s suiting style – and you’ll stand out. But remember, anchor your outfit with a faithful, classic white shirt.

5 style lessons we can learn from Eddie Redmayne

The denim jacket

Like a good pair of jeans, there is nothing quite as trusty as a rugged denim jacket. Eddie Redmayne clearly agrees – as his wardrobe doesn’t seem to be short of these outerwear stalwarts.

In colours from the classic stonewashed blue to a dark grey, Redmayne rocks the denim jacket open, with a flicked collar and worn over everything from a plain loose t-shirt to a thick, shawl neck jumper. Take note, this is a jacket for all seasons.

5 style lessons we can learn from Eddie Redmayne

The scarf work

Like the denim jacket, Redmayne isn’t afraid to throw a scarf on with any outfit. From casual to uber-formal, there is a scarf for almost every occasion. The key is knowing when to wear what.

Following the actor’s lead, you should wear a big, thick knit on a cold day – pairing it with a large overcoat or woollen jacket. For more upscale events, go for a silk dress scarf – but put a twist on the traditional by wearing it in a non-standard way. Finally, for awkward autumn weather, pair a lighter jacket with a lighter scarf – a fine ‘somewhere in the middle’ knit wrapped loosely around your neck.

5 style lessons we can learn from Eddie Redmayne

The round-neck jumper

Despite a penchant for an aztec cardigan or checked shirt, Redmayne can appreciate the quieter subtleness of block colours – a skill most notable in his jumper collection.

From navy to deep red, the classic chino, blue button-down and round-neck jumper combination is one that never lets the actor down, and will keep you looking cool, too. Show your sleeves, a hint of belt and – if you really want to follow in Redmayne’s footsteps – hang your sunglasses from the neck to introduce a touch of the v-neck.

5 style lessons we can learn from Eddie Redmayne

The formal layer

Dressing down a suit is a difficult job. Those who simply throw a t-shirt on under a tailored two-piece risk losing all class to the outfit, but take heed of Redmayne’s solution and you’ll keep the comfort without losing the formality.

Be this with a cardigan or jumper, introducing an element of knitwear can negate the need for a tie, and add interest to your suit. This works best with a textured suit, creating depth to the outfit. Oh, and the last Redmayne tip? A pocket square – picked out for pattern or colour.

Loading New Article

Older Browser Detected -

We're sorry, but the Gentleman's Journal website uses modern features that aren't supported in your browser. Unfortunately, some aspects of our website will not work for you.

To enjoy the full experience, please update your browser HERE Or download one of the following modern alternatives:

Close